Last edited by Kilrajas
Saturday, May 2, 2020 | History

3 edition of Division of lands and funds of Osage Indians, Oklahoma. found in the catalog.

Division of lands and funds of Osage Indians, Oklahoma.

United States. Congress. House

Division of lands and funds of Osage Indians, Oklahoma.

  • 247 Want to read
  • 36 Currently reading

Published by [s.n.] in Washington .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Tribal trust funds,
  • Osage Indians,
  • Oklahoma

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesFor division of lands and funds of Osage Indians, Oklahoma
    SeriesH.rp.3219
    ContributionsUnited States. Congress. House. Committee on Indian Affairs
    The Physical Object
    FormatElectronic resource
    Pagination5 p.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16083297M

    [The primary content for this article is an edited rendition of the Osage Indians as told in William G. Cutler’s History of the State of Kansas, first published in ]. Of the Indian nations living north of the Arkansas River and west of the Mississippi River, the Osage were best known to the French during the early years of their occupancy of Louisiana.   United States and Osage Tribe Announce $ Million Settlement of Tribal Trust Lawsuit WASHINGTON – The United States has reached a final settlement of a long-running lawsuit by the Osage Tribe of Oklahoma regarding the United States’ accounting and management of the tribe’s trust funds and non-monetary trust assets. The United States Department of the Interior (DI) is a federal executive department of the U.S. is responsible for the management and conservation of most federal lands and natural resources, and the administration of programs relating to Native Americans, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, territorial affairs, and insular areas of the United budget: $ billion (). It came from the Department of Interior with the opening sentence: “To all members of the Osage” and several other Native nations, “distribution of funds from Indian Location: Skiatook, OK.


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Division of lands and funds of Osage Indians, Oklahoma. by United States. Congress. House Download PDF EPUB FB2

David Grann was already interested in writing a book about the serial murders of members of the Oklahoma-based Osage Indian tribe when he visited the Osage Nation Museum. On one wall was a panoramic photo of members of the tribe taken inbut there was a panel missing.

In the s, the Osage Indians were herded onto a small tract of land in Oklahoma—land that unexpectedly held vast reserves of oil, rendering the tribe incredibly rich overnight. By law, the Osage had mineral rights outright, although they were still treated like children, requiring a white "guardian" to manage their assets/5(62).

The Amazon Editors' Pick for the Best Book of In the s, the Osage found themselves in a unique position among Native Americans tribes. As other tribal lands were parceled out in an effort by the government to encourage dissolution and assimilation of both lands and culture, the Osage negotiated to maintain the mineral rights for their corner of Oklahoma, creating a kind /5(K).

For the division of lands and funds of the Osage Indians in Oklahoma Territory, and for other purposes’’, approved J (34 Stat. ), means the persons eligible for allot-ments of Osage Reservation lands and a pro rata share of the Osage mineral estate as provided in that Act, not member-ship in the Osage Tribe for all purposes.

Congress hereby reaffirms the. 6 The Act ofwhich was an act for the division of lands and funds of the Osage Indians, provided for the making of a roll to include living members as of January 1,and all children born up to July 1, It appears that this roll on which allotments of lands were made contained 2, members.

The Osage Nation Real Estate Services Department provides management and oversite on approximatelyacres of individually and tribally owned restricted and trust lands.

The Department offers farming and grazing lease management of. Bigheart finally accomplished a Federal investigation of theOsage Indian rolls in to eliminate those not entitled to Osageproperty rights. I n the early 's, the mixed bloods, known as the\"Progressive Party,\" began a movement to secure the division ofmillion and half acres of Osage land among tribal members.

This book is a very good mystery thriller. The history books on American history don't mention this sad period of time when many of the Osage Indians were murdered by some of the white people in the area.

It took the FBI two and half months to brings the murderers to trail/5(40). Official website of the Osage Nation, a federally-recognized Native American government.

Headquartered in Pawhuska, Oklahoma, approx. 60 miles northwest of Tulsa, Osage Nation exercises governmental jurisdiction over the Osage reservation, a more than square miles area extending from Tulsa to Kansas. The Department of Interior continued to manage the trust lands and pay fees to Osage with headrights.

Inthe tribe filed a lawsuit against the department, alleging that federal government management of the trust assets had resulted in historical losses to its trust funds and interest income. Grann’s new book, about Oklahoma.

book dozens of members of the Osage Indian nation in Oklahoma in the s were shot, poisoned or blown to Oklahoma. book by rapacious whites who coveted the oil under their land.

InLt. Col. George Armstrong Custer chose Osage scouts in his campaign against Chief Black Kettle and his band of Cheyenne and Arapaho Indians in western Oklahoma. He knew the Osage for because of their scouting expertise.

(2) Restricted land derived from allotments made to members of the Five Civilized Tribes (Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Creek, and Seminole) in Oklahoma; and (3) Restricted interests derived from allotments made to Osage Indians in Oklahoma (Osage Nation) and Osage headright interests owned by Osage decedents.

The Division of Land Titles and Records (DLTR), and its 18 Land Titles and Records Offices (LTRO), are the official Federal offices-of-record for all documents affecting title to Indian lands, and for the determination, maintenance, and certified reporting of land title ownership and encumbrance on Indian trust and restricted lands.

the lands and funds of the Osage Indians in Oklahoma Terri-torv, and for other purposes.' (34 Stat. ); ' (6) the term 'Osage Indians Act of ' means the Act approved Ap, and entitled 'An Act Supplementary to and amendatory of the Act entitled "An Act for the division of the lands and funds of the Osage Nation of Indians in Okla­.

In addition, each headright holder, that is, one entitled to an equal share of the tribe's mineral interests, was allotted just over acres in Osage County, Oklahoma. Unlike other reservation allotments in Oklahoma, there were no surplus lands after Osage allotment.

The Osage had purchased their reservation and owned it in fee simple. Fort Osage, built on a Missouri River bluff miles west of St. Louis, was officially opened on that date, and the Osage Indians signed a treaty with the Americans written by Governor Meriwether Lewis.

For a short time, the fort did provide the Osage with a place to trade their furs. OF LANDS ALLOTTED AMONG THE OSAGE INDIANS There are sever al features in the Osage allotments under the Act of J34 Stat.

perhaps as purchasers with restricted funds under the Act of Febru43 Stat. the Osage tribe," as indicated herein above, is frequently construed to include only allotted. An added bonus for the villains who pitched up in Osage territory was that it was a long way from any police department’s notice.

What law enforcement existed was. Abstract: InCongress passed “An Act for the division of the lands and funds of the Osage Indians in Oklahoma Territory, and for other purposes,” providing for the allotment of the Osage Nation's lands.

CHAP. An Act For the division of the lands and funds of the Osage Indians in Oklahoma Territory, and for other purposes. Be it enacted by the Senate and IIouse of Representatives of tte United States of America in Congress assernbled, That the roll of the Osage tribe of Indians, as shown by the records of the United States in the.

Prior to the taking effect of the act of Congress of J(34 Stat. ,) entitled "An act for the division of the lands and funds of the Osage Indians in Oklahoma territory, and for other purposes," a member of the Osage Tribe of Indians had no estate or interest in the lands and other property of the tribe to which her heirs would succeed at her death.

PUBLIC LAW —OCT. 30, 98 STAT. Public Law 98th Congress An Act To provide that any Osage headright or restricted real estate or funds which is part of the estate of a deceased Osage Indian who did not possess a certificate of com- Oct.

30, petency at the time of death shall be exempt from any estate or inheritance tax [H.R. ] imposed by the State of Oklahoma. of the lands then held by the Osage to individual enrolled members of the Osage Tribe.

34 Stat. () ( Act). The Act, titled “An act for the division of the lands and funds of the Osage * Indians in Oklahoma Territory, and for other purposes,” provides, by section 2, “[t]hat all lands belonging to the Osage tribe.

Today, we joined Osage Tribe Principal Chief John Red Eagle, other tribal leaders, and our colleagues at the Treasury Department, in a ceremony to commemorate a historic settlement marking the end of a long-running lawsuit by the Osage Tribe of Oklahoma regarding claims involving the United States’ accounting and management of the tribe’s.

THE OCCURRENCE OF OIL AND GAS IN OSAGE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA. INTRODUCTION. Osage, the largest oounty in Oklahoma, is situated Book p.

34, division of the lands. an'a. funds of. the Osage Indians. Oklahoma Territory, and. for other. purl. The last land opening in Oklahoma Territory, with the minor exception of the salt plains in Alfalfa County, was in Land ownership in the Panhandle was possible after the first official survey of the area in the s.

Oklahoma statehood occurred Novemby joining Oklahoma Territory and Indian Territory. The last county in. The Act, titled “An act for the division of the lands and funds of the Osage Indians in Oklahoma Territory, and for other purposes,” provides, by section 2, “[t]hat all lands belonging to the Osage tribe shall be divided among the members of said tribe” with.

The Osage Hills is a hilly area in Oklahoma, commonly known as The name refers to the broad rolling hills and rolling tallgrass prairie and Cross Timbers encompassing Osage County and surrounding areas, including portions of Mayes, Tulsa, Washington and Kay Counties.

The Osage is the southern extension of the Flint Hills of Kansas. Act for the Division of Lands and Funds of the Osage Indians in Oklahoma Territory, and for Other Purposes” and “An Act to Reaffirm the Inherent Sovereign Rights of the Osage Tribe to Determine Its Membership and Form of Government”) THE OSAGE TRIBE OF INDIANS) OF OKLAHOMA,)) Plaintiff,) v.)) THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,)).

Rolls of Indian Tribes in Oklahoma Absentee Shawnee (Big Jim's Band), Cheyenne and Arapahoe, Iowa, Kickapoo, Kiowa, Comanche, and Apache, Otoe, Missouri, Pawnee, Ponca, Pottawatomie and Fox. by Emily Johnson FHL film: Approved Roll of Osage Indians in Oklahoma, FHL film: item 2 Vital Records Fort Sill Apaches.

The Osage Indians lived in Kansas until the s when the government decided that their land was too valuable for them to own, and the Osage Indians were being forced off their land. The Osage Indians were moved to Northeastern Oklahoma on a patch of ground that was deemed worthless - until oil was discovered beneath the reservation land in /5(K).

According to the Indian Office census ofthey numbered 3,; in1,;1,; (after the division of the tribal lands and trust funds had been provided for), 1, The following villages were occupied by the Osage at different time. M, Status of Allotted Lands of Tribes Organized Under Oklahoma Indian Welfare Act: 08/25/ M, Lands Purchased With Unrestricted Funds of Osage Indians -- Trust Character After Devise: 11/21/ of rights inof persons to or inteiest in the lands, money, or mineral interests, as provided nol.

34, p. in the Act of Congress approved J (Thirty-fourth Statutes at Large, page ), entitled "An Act for the division of the lands and funds of the Osage Indians in Oklahoma, and for.

Leaders and citizens of the Osage Nation at the Octoannouncement in Washington, D.C., of a $ million settlement to the tribe's trust fund lawsuit. Photo: U.S. Department of the Interior Going forward, some guidance might be found in the $ million settlement that the Obama administration reached with the Osage Nation back in.

other means, under any Act of Congress applicable to the Osage Tribe of Indians or applicable generally to Indians or any bands, tribes, or nations of Indians; and (4) the term "Osage Tribe Allotment Act" means the Act approved J, and entitled "An Act for the division of the lands and funds of the Osage Indians in Oklahoma Terri­.

Osage Hills: | || | | | ||| | Photo of the |Tallgrass Prairie P World Heritage Encyclopedia, the aggregation of the largest online encyclopedias available, and the. The Osages were paid $ per acre for their land.

After buying their own land in Oklahoma from their former enemies the Cherokees, the tribe still had $ million in trust, drawing five percent interest. They held the land in common, until they had to apportion it. Still they maintained community ownership of mineral rights to their land.

“The Osage moved into the Oklahoma land purchased from the Cherokees inbut didn’t move in until Pawhuska, a city in Osage County, Oklahoma is the county seat and the capital of the Osage Nation.

The city has a total area of km (or miles square, all land. Text of H.R. (th): To reaffirm the inherent sovereign as of Jun 1, (Passed the House version). H.R. (th): To reaffirm the inherent sovereign rights of the Osage Tribe to determine its membership and form of government.An act for the division of the lands and funds of the Osage Indians in Oklahoma Territory, from Indian Affairs: Laws and Treaties, compiled and edited by Charles J.

Kappler, an historically significant, seven volume compilation of U.S. treaties, laws and executive orders pertaining to Native American Indian tribes.Children's Books. The Choctaw Code - by Russell G.

Davis and Brent K. Ashabranner This book won the Oklahoma Book Award in the children's division, but is suitable for all ages.

$ The Choctaw - by Emilie U. Lepthien A brief history of the Choctaw Tribe for juvenile readers. Illustrated on every page. $ Johnny Rides Again - by Jo.